Sunday, May 30, 2010

How to Make a Rabbit Trap

  1. Step 1

    Locate a sturdy box. The box should be heavy enough that it can hold a wild rabbit. A box made out of wood or metal is the best type to use when making a rabbit trap.

  2. Step 2

    Find a stick that is thick and doesn't have any weak spots. The stick should be approximately 6" to 8" inches long. If there are any branches on the stick, remove them with a knife.

  3. Step 3

    Get a piece of string or wire that is about 18" long. Tie the piece of string to the stick. The point of connection should be about 2" from the bottom end of the stick.

  4. Step 4

    Tie the other end of the stick to a piece of food. It should be something rabbits eat, such as a carrot or a piece of celery.

  5. Step 5

    Place the trap in an area with a lot of rabbit tracks. Find a flat surface and remove any rocks or debris that may be in the way.

  6. Step 6

    Prop up the box with the stick and place the food item underneath the box. Make sure there is no slack in the string or wire.

  7. Step 7

    Test out the rabbit trap by finding a long stick and moving the food item. When you attempt to move the bait, the string or wire should pull the stick and cause the box to fall flat on the ground to trap the rabbit.

Saturday, May 29, 2010

How to Build a Rabbit Hutch

    Construct a Hutch for Your Rabbits

  1. Step 1

    Stop by your pet store, or inquire where you bought your plywood and lumber if there are any layouts or plans available to help you build your rabbit hutch. You might be able to make things easier on yourself and enjoy help from a convenient illustrated guide.

  2. Step 2

    Pick up a regular wire cage used for indoor rabbit housing. Readily available at pet shops and farming supply centers, you can avoid the hassle (and danger) of having to fashion your own wire frame by using a ready-built cage as the base of your rabbit hutch. To make your own, nail 4 legs to the desired square footage of plywood. Wrap wire in a straight line around all four legs, leaving about an inch of space between each line. Tie them down snugly and cut off loose ends with your wire cutters.

  3. Step 3

    Take your 2 by 4s and use them to construct a support frame around the wire cage you procured in Step 2. This will make your rabbit hutch sturdier and more better suited for use outdoors or in a barn.

  4. Step 4

    Build legs for your rabbit hutch using another four 2 by 4s. Most experts recommend that the hutch's legs be at least 3 feet in length. This will make cleaning and maintaining the hutch much easier.

  5. Step 5

    Choose the spot where you want to situate the new rabbit hutch and hammer the legs into the ground.

  6. Step 6

    Finish by building a plywood roof for the hutch. While some people simply prefer to lay a loose piece of plywood over the top, a hinged roof is much better. It is also wiser to build the roof on a slope to prevent precipitation from collecting on top of it.

  7. Step 7

    Add accessories as you prefer. A retractable pan that collects the rabbit feces is a popular addition. Shingles or shielding the hutch with a clear plastic cover also helps preserve it in the face of the elements.

Friday, May 28, 2010

How to Make a Rabbit Snare

  1. Step 1

    Cut off a piece of stainless steal wire measuring about 21 inches long.

  2. Step 2

    Bend the wire into a small loop about 1.5 inch from one end of your wire. Twist the wire until the loop is formed and tight enough not to come loose. If the loops comes loose, the rabbit can escape.

  3. Step 3

    Bring the other end of the wire through the small loop you made at the other end. This will form the larger loop that will capture the rabbit around the neck.

  4. Step 4

    Form another small loop on the end of the wire you just brought through the first loop. Follow the same instructions as making the first loop, bending the wire about 1.5 inch from the end of the wire. Once again, tighten the new loop so it won't come loose.

  5. Step 5

    Cut off enough string to suit your snare purposes. The length will depend on how you are going to set up your snare. Cut off a few extra inches to ensure the string is long enough to set your snare. Tie one end of the string to the second loop you formed. Get ready to snare some rabbits.

Thursday, May 27, 2010

How to Bond With Your Rabbit

  1. Step 1

    Place your rabbit in his new play area and open the travel case door. Then stand back and let your rabbit decide when to venture out of the travel case and begin to explore his new surroundings.

  2. Step 2

    Speak softly to your rabbit and try not to speak in high-pitched tones or screeches because rabbits's ears are very sensitive to loud noises.

  3. Step 3

    Allow a skittish rabbit two or more days to get accustomed to his surroundings before you enter his play area to begin the bonding process.

  4. Step 4

    Speak softly to your rabbit and extend your hand with the fingers together and the back of your hand facing your rabbit to see if he'll let you pet him. If he hops away, just say, 'That's okay, (your rabbit's name). Maybe later you'll let me pet you.'

  5. Step 5

    Spend at least a half hour to an hour or more sitting in your rabbit's play area with him each day.

  6. Step 6

    Read a book or just sit there with your hands in your lap and let your rabbit decide when to check you out. He will. Rabbits are very curious and quite daring when they feel safe.

  7. Step 7

    If you can, sleep on the floor by your rabbit's play area for a few nights because it's difficult for anyone or anybunny to feel threatened by someone whose head is below theirs. Lie down on your rabbit's play area floor and let him check you out.

  8. Step 8

    Always approach your rabbit from the front side of his head, so he can see you. If you approach from above his head, he will either run from you or attack for fear you're a bird who is hunting him.

  9. Step 9

    Speak in a soft, gentle tone of voice; avoid raising your voice or using the high-pitched squeak we use with human children. Rabbits' ears are sensitive to loud, high-pitched tones.

  10. Step 10

    Offer your rabbit a treat: a small piece of banana, a small carrot, a handful of his favority grass hay.

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

How to Clean Your Rabbit's Cage or Play Area

  1. Step 1

    Mix equal portions of white vinegar and water in a spray bottle; label the bottle.

  2. Step 2

    Rinse and scrub your rabbit's play area thoroughly with this vinegar and water solution to keep calcium residues down and help control odors.

  3. Step 3

    Rinse thoroughly with water to eliminate the white vinegar smell. Many rabbits don't like the smell of vinegar, so they won't urinate in an area where they smell it. Use paper towels to scrub and dry the area.

  4. Step 4

    Make sure no urine has seeped under your rabbit's litter box. Clean this area as well as the litter box (see "How to Clean Your Rabbit's Litter Box," under Related eHows).

  5. Step 5

    Clean any areas where the urine has seeped using the white vinegar and warm water solution, then rinse thoroughly to remove the vinegar smell.

  6. Step 6

    Use the same solution to blot any urine stains on your carpet, upholstery or clothing, or use straight white vinegar.

  7. Step 7

    Use a broom or a vacuum cleaner to clean up any droppings or fur that your rabbit leaves as he hops about the room. Rabbits tend to be territorial and often deposit droppings as they hop about in an effort to declare the area their territory.

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Monday, May 24, 2010

Sunday, May 23, 2010

Saturday, May 22, 2010

How to Recognize Illness in Your Rabbit

  1. Step 1

    Take your rabbit to a rabbit-savvy veterinarian for a well-bunny check when he first comes to live with you. Ask your vet to show you how to examine your rabbit at home.

  2. Step 2

    Play with your rabbit for at least a few minutes every day. As he bonds with you, he'll let you touch him more often. He may even let you pick him up occasionally.

  3. Step 3

    Do a full body check of your rabbit during your daily petting sessions. Gently check his ears, eyes, paws, legs, tummy, back and teeth, based on your veterinarian's instructions.

  4. Step 4

    Observe his normal condition so that you will immediately recognize anything out of the ordinary such as lumps, sores, bruises or cuts. Note whether there's something in his ear, if his stomach seems full or tight, or if his teeth seem out of line.

  5. Step 5

    Check the color of his urine daily; it can range from orange to yellow to brown. If you're not sure whether the urine looks normal, ask your vet to test a sample. Milky white or sludgy urine (containing a grainy, sandy material) means that your rabbit may be eating foods too high in calcium. The grains are calcified crystals, which can form painful bladder stones.

  6. Step 6

    Check your rabbit's feces daily to get familiar with how they look when normal. If his feces are smaller than normal or oddly shaped or colored, his stomach or cecum may be blocked. Dry feces mean your rabbit may be dehydrated and needs subcutaneous fluids immediately. If his feces are too soft, he may have a virus. Bring your rabbit to the vet immediately if you notice any of these symptoms.

  7. Step 7

    Take your rabbit to the veterinarian immediately if you suspect he's suffering from a blockage. Most vets will treat a blockage with medication and subcutaneous fluids.

  8. Step 8

    Take a lethargic rabbit to the vet immediately. House rabbits are generally very active, unless they are napping. If your rabbit's usual activity level lessens, try to tempt him with his favorite vegetable, treat or toy. If he refuses his favorite treat, take him to the vet.

  9. Step 9

    Keep some rabbit-safe supplies in your pet's medicine chest. If he is suffering from gas pain, ask your veterinarian for the correct dosage of Phazyme, based on your rabbit's body weight. Phazyme provides quick relief from gas pain for most rabbits. Also keep styptic powder or baking powder on hand to stop bleeding from broken toenails.



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Friday, May 21, 2010

How to Train Your Rabbit

Rabbits are incredibly intelligent creatures. Many teach themselves to use a litter box; others need a bit of guidance. Most rabbits learn after just a short period of repetition to understand certain words, phrases, or commands. Don't expect them to obey you every time, however, because their intelligence also propels them to make their own decisions. Many's the time I've felt I could see them considering a decision only to reject it. Rabbits are fiercely independent creatures.

  1. Step 1

    Always use positive feedback; praise your rabbit. Do not criticize, scold, or hit; this will only serve to alienate your rabbit.

  2. Step 2

    Speak softly and gently to your rabbit to induce him to listen to you.

  3. Step 3

    Use repetition. For example, when you want to litter box train your rabbit, you might say the following while letting the rabbit smell the contents of the litter box: 'Do pebbles, Smokey. Do pebbles.' Or 'Do puddle, Smokey. Do puddle.'

  4. Step 4

    Don't force your rabbit to do something. Just guide him and let him go, if he resists or tries to hop away.

  5. Step 5

    Spend at least an hour or two each day for one or two weeks working on the new behavior with your rabbit.

  6. Step 6

    Remember that rabbits are rabbits. They are not cats or dogs or any other animal, so they will not act like any other animal. They will only manifest rabbit behavior.



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Thursday, May 20, 2010

How to Exercise a Pet Rabbit

It's good for a pet rabbit to exercise so that they will be healthy and live longer. Just like us they can get lazy and fat then they have health problems and guess who has to pay for it. That's right it's YOU! If you have a pet rabbit it's in your best interest to make sure that it gets exercise everyday.

  1. Step 1
    Run bunny run!
    Run bunny run!

    Pet rabbits need exercise and one of the best ways you can do it is to make it a game. They love to play! I found this out by accident when my pet rabbit started running around me in circles. The more excited I got the faster he ran. All you have to do is clap your hands and say silly stuff like, "Look at that bunny go."

    As he is doing this you turn in circles and watch him because this is how he knows you're paying attention. They love to show off!

  2. Step 2
    Bunny's ball
    Bunny's ball

    Another way to exercise your pet rabbit is to get a small ball and roll it toward him. He will start to push it with his nose, stand on it and roll it if you yell and act like it's the greatest trick you've ever seen.

    They're kind of like playing with kids, so if you have kids you know what I'm talking about. Like any other pet, the pet rabbit, becomes part of the family.

    If you leave the ball lying around he will go get it and push it to you so you will play with him. That's if you give him run of the house, which I do. However, he only gets to run the house when I'm home because he can get destructive if not watched closely.

  3. Step 3
    Playtime in the snow
    Playtime in the snow

    This exercise is really fun because we take the pet rabbit outside to play in the snow. Yes, they love the snow. They jump, run, tunnel and go wacky in it. I found this out by accident too! I thought he wouldn't like it, but wanted to see his reaction. To my surprise when I started running around yelling, like I always do to get him going, he began to run in circles and dig tunnels.

  4. Step 4
    Bunny hides from the broom
    Bunny hides from the broom

    My pet rabbit loves to play in tunnels which I guess is a natural instinct or something. So, I made make shift tunnels in the basement for him to run through. Some of them I made out of plastic and others I used cardboard. What I do to get this game going is chase him with a broom, he hates the broom, I don't know why, but he does. When he see's the broom he runs into the tunnel and I wait at the other end to get him when he comes out. Then he sees the broom again and runs like crazy back to the other end of the tunnel.

  5. Step 5
    Bunny will stand for food!
    Bunny will stand for food!

    I use this pet rabbit exercise to settle him down a bit and to stretch him. It's good for rabbit's to stretch out they spend most of their time hunched up. All I do is get a favorite food like a piece of banana, let him smell it, and hold it up high so he's forced to stand on two legs to reach it. I do this several times in a row so he's up down, up down.

  6. Step 6
    Tired Bunny!
    Tired Bunny!

    Finally, the pet rabbit needs his rest. After all that exercise he's ready to call it a day and so am I.



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Wednesday, May 19, 2010

havana rabbit.

Popular Rabbit Breeds

When considering what rabbit breed you want to select as your next pet, you certainly have a wide variety to choose from. This article will briefly review some of the most popular rabbit breeds to date.

Lops are a group of rabbit breeds known for their distinctive floppy ears. There are several different types of lops, including the popular American Fuzzy Lop and the Holland Lop. American Fuzzy Lops have long fur and are somewhat shy; Holland Lops are compact and cute, and known for their pleasant temperament.

The Rex is a breed of rabbit that comes in standard or mini sizes. Standard Rex rabbits weigh in at around eight pounds and mini Rex's weigh in at about 4 pounds. They are known for being easy to breed, and they make good mothers. Owners of Rex's are particularly fond of their soft, velvety feeling fur, which is a pleasure to pet.

The American Chinchilla is a rabbit breed (not a chinchilla!) that weighs in at around ten pounds. They have a good demeanor and very soft, appealing fur which is usually a salt and pepper color. They have the potential to be as friendly and intelligent as most rabbits.

Flemish Giants are massive rabbits that can grow up to twenty two pounds in size, although they are usually closer to fifteen pounds. These rabbits have a very calm, docile demeanor, and they love to nestle in your lap. You can get these rabbits in nearly any typical rabbit color.

Himalayan rabbits are usually about four pounds in size. They have been bred in Asia for a long period of time. These rabbits are the most widely distributed around the world of all the types of rabbits. They are known for their calm nature and willingness to spend time in your lap. These rabbits are great for first time rabbit owners.

The Havana usually weighs in at around five pounds. These rabbits are known for being fun-loving and active. They have a good natured demeanor and are incredibly cute.

How to Breed Rabbits

  1. Step 1

    Keep buck and does separate. Three or four does can be kept together in an appropriate-size hutch.

  2. Step 2

    Use 1 buck per 10 does.

  3. Step 3

    Breed does at their maturity - 6 months of age for small to medium breeds and 9 to 12 months of age for large or giant breeds.

  4. Step 4

    Pick the doe to be bred and place her in her own hutch for two weeks before mating.

  5. Step 5

    Place the doe in the buck's pen for mating. Place her with the buck twice - once in the evening and again in the morning.

  6. Step 6

    Remove the doe after each mating.

  7. Step 7

    Place a nest box in the hutch 28 days after breeding.

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

How to Train Your Rabbit

Rabbits are incredibly intelligent creatures. Many teach themselves to use a litter box; others need a bit of guidance. Most rabbits learn after just a short period of repetition to understand certain words, phrases, or commands. Don't expect them to obey you every time, however, because their intelligence also propels them to make their own decisions. Many's the time I've felt I could see them considering a decision only to reject it. Rabbits are fiercely independent creatures.

  1. Step 1

    Always use positive feedback; praise your rabbit. Do not criticize, scold, or hit; this will only serve to alienate your rabbit.

  2. Step 2

    Speak softly and gently to your rabbit to induce him to listen to you.

  3. Step 3

    Use repetition. For example, when you want to litter box train your rabbit, you might say the following while letting the rabbit smell the contents of the litter box: 'Do pebbles, Smokey. Do pebbles.' Or 'Do puddle, Smokey. Do puddle.'

  4. Step 4

    Don't force your rabbit to do something. Just guide him and let him go, if he resists or tries to hop away.

  5. Step 5

    Spend at least an hour or two each day for one or two weeks working on the new behavior with your rabbit.

  6. Step 6

    Remember that rabbits are rabbits. They are not cats or dogs or any other animal, so they will not act like any other animal. They will only manifest rabbit behavior.

Monday, May 17, 2010

How to Trim Your Rabbit's Toenails

It's not always easy to clip a rabbit's nails, especially if you're by yourself. Here are two ways to make nail trimming as painless as possible for you and your rabbit. If you have bonded and your rabbit trusts you, this will make trimming his nails a bit easier.
  1. Step 1

    Place your rabbit on a towel on the floor.

  2. Step 2

    Let him sit comfortably, then hold him securely against you.

  3. Step 3

    Take hold of one of his paws on the side that's farther away from you.

  4. Step 4

    Hold a flashlight behind his nails if they have a dark color. This will help you see where the "quick" (the blood vessel) ends. Leave some space between the end of the quick and the point where you trim the nail so it doesn't bleed. If you cut into the quick, it will bleed profusely and your rabbit will feel pain.

  5. Step 5

    Hold each nail securely as you trim it, but be prepared to let go immediately if your rabbit struggles.

  6. Step 6

    If you accidentally cut the quick, dip a cotton swab in styptic powder, cornstarch or baking powder and dab it against the bleeding nail to stop the blood flow.

  7. Step 7

    Go to the next paw, then turn your rabbit around to trim the nails on his other two paws.

  8. Step 8

    Give your rabbit a treat when you're finished. This will help him understand that you weren't punishing him or trying to hurt him.

  9. With Help

  10. Step 1

    Ask a friend or family member to help you trim your rabbit's nails. Show your friend how to hold your rabbit correctly.

  11. Step 2

    Hold one paw gently but firmly, and separate the toe you want to trim. Hold a flashlight behind your rabbit's nails if they are dark. This will help you see where the quick (blood vessel) ends, so you can trim the part of the nail that doesn't have a quick.

  12. Step 3

    Position the trimmer about 1/8 to 1/4 inch away from the quick (see step 4, above). Hold each nail securely as you trim it, but be prepared to let go immediately if your rabbit struggles.

Sunday, May 16, 2010

How to Choose Toys for Your Rabbit

Rabbits are very sociable, intelligent, and curious, so they can get bored easily, if they have nothing to do. Rabbits love to play, explore, and race around the house, especially with their human companions. If your rabbit trusts you and has a good relationship with you, then you are in for a treat. When rabbits play, they enjoy tossing things, jumping, racing about, lunging at "the enemy," and playing chase games.

  1. Step 1

    Buy some rabbit-safe toys for your rabbit to play with. These include hard plastic baby key rattles, small untreated baskets (natural, with no varnishes or colorings), plastic Slinky toys (make sure the Slinky is too small for your rabbit to get its head or paws stuck in it), some kitten play toys like wire balls with bells in them (again, make sure they're too small for your rabbit's paws or head to get stuck in).

  2. Step 2

    Sit on the floor with your rabbit. Rabbits, like cats, are independent. You must play with them on their terms and where they feel safe.

  3. Step 3

    If the toy makes noise, shake it and then place it in your rabbit's play area, close enough for your rabbit to reach. He will probably sniff it, then pick it up and toss it.

  4. Step 4

    Dry, clean, empty toilet paper rolls stuffed with Timothy hay are another neat toy; your rabbit will enjoy nibbling the hay stuffed inside and chewing and tossing the cardboard roll.

  5. Step 5

    Use the toys to play with your rabbit. Be careful not to scare him. If your rabbit wants to play, he may lunge at the toy you're offering him and pretend attack it. Let him have it to toss around. Praise him lavishly for his antics.

  6. Step 6

    Give your rabbit newspaper or a telephone book to shred. Since rabbits are chewers, they love to shred paper. Make sure your rabbit isn't eating these objects.

Saturday, May 15, 2010

About Rabbit Farming

About Rabbit  Farming
About Rabbit Farming
Jonae Fredericks

Rabbit farming may not be for everyone, and certainly the slaughter of the furry little rabbits for their meat is not for the weak of heart. For some families, however, rabbit farming can be a matter of necessity. While the cost of traditional farm meats continues to rise at the local supermarket, knowing that a protein-rich source of meat is on your own land can ensure a satisfying and healthy dinner any time you need one.


    Considerations

  1. The upfront costs of rabbit farming are relatively low. The initial investment of several male and female rabbits, along with a hutch and some feed, are really all that is needed.
  2. Size

  3. If you are a first time rabbit farmer, it is a good idea to start slowly. It is best to stick with your initial investment before purchasing more rabbits for breeding until you decide that rabbit farming is something that you enjoy, or is a farming hobby that is successfully supplementing your home meat supply or income.
  4. Prevention/Solution

  5. Cleanliness is a necessity for any rabbit farm. Cleaning the rabbit hutches on a daily basis and keeping them free of excess rabbit droppings will reduce the chances that flies will linger and spread disease.
  6. Types

  7. Not every type of rabbit is beneficial to breed for the purposes of consumption. The Californian and Cinnamon rabbits are both ideal for breeding as pets and food.
  8. Geography

  9. Healthy rabbits require a suitable environment, and conditions that are too humid or excessively cold will prove inadequate. Providing your rabbits with proper ventilation and protection from the elements is essential.
  10. Nourishment

  11. Providing your rabbits with essential nourishment is important. Commercially sold rabbit pellets are adequate, but should be supplemented with salad greens, hay or freshly cut grass.
  12. Warning

  13. Even though the rabbit BABIES that you are raising may be cute, refrain from touching them. To a mother rabbit, any foreign scent (especially human) on her babies could incite her to kill them.

Friday, May 14, 2010

How to Introduce Your Rabbit to People

Rabbits are very sociable creatures. They enjoy interacting with their human companions once they learn to trust them (see the Bond With Your Rabbit eHow). Their social nature makes most rabbits happiest when they have a rabbit companion or another companion. (see Choose a Rabbit Companion for Your Rabbit.

  1. Step 1

    Coach the people before they meet your rabbit, so they know not to touch your rabbit, until you give permission to do so.

  2. Step 2

    Make sure that visitors keep their voices at a regular speaking decibel or lower, so they won't hurt your rabbit's sensitive hears with all the noise.

  3. Step 3

    Ask visitors to approach your rabbit in the same manner you have taught him to accept from you.

  4. Step 4

    Hold your rabbit the first few times your visitors approach to make sure your rabbit knows he's safe.

  5. Step 5

    Do not ever leave your rabbit alone with a houseguest because your rabbit may panic and bite or scratch when he thinks he's alone with a stranger.

  6. Step 6

    Supervise all interactions between your rabbit and any visitors to make sure your rabbit remains calm.

  7. Step 7

    If your rabbit panics at any time, stop the introductions and return your rabbit to his room or play area, so he can romp about undisturbed.

Thursday, May 13, 2010

How to Buy a Rabbit

Rabbits are highly sociable creatures. They love to interact with their human companions and rabbit buddies once they are bonded. There is nothing sadder or more depressed than a rabbit left in an outdoor hutch with no toys to stimulate his intelligence and no human companion to stimulate his playfulness and feed his desire for interaction. If you want to buy a rabbit, please give him or her a safe, clean home inside your own home where he can become a true companion to you and your family. Rabbits are delicate, sensitive creatures who thrive best in adult homes or homes with older CHILDREN who are sensitive to their care needs. Children under the age of 8 are much too young to correctly handle a rabbit. Parents need to always monitor their children's interaction with their rabbit because if your rabbit gets scared or if a child accidentally hurts him, he may bite your child in self defense.

  1. Step 1

    Buy the supplies you will need to provide your rabbit with a comfortable play area in your home before you bring your rabbit home. Set your rabbit's play area up in a corner of the room where there is not a lot of foot traffic, noise from outdoors, or drafts. (see Shopping List)

  2. Step 2

    Make your rabbit more a part of your family by placing him in a play area rather than a cage inside your home. Houserabbits can live longer, healthier lives than outdoor hutch rabbits who may be stalked by predators or scared to death by noises or animals.

  3. Step 3

    Make sure everything you buy for your rabbit is the correct size for him, such as food dish, water dish or bottle, flea comb (for grooming), litterbox, play area fence (dog fence's work well), and travel case.

  4. Step 4

    Select a rabbit breed that is right for your lifestyle and living situation: larger rabbits tend to be more mellow, although this is not always the case; and smaller, dwarf breeds tend to be more high strung and are happiest in quiet, adult households where they can receive individualized attention.

  5. Step 5

    Keep in mind that breed information about rabbit temperaments is not as accurate as it is about dog temperaments. Each rabbit is a distinct individual and if you work on bonding with a high-strung rabbit, he may become more mellow over a period of years. One of my rabbits always bit me and drew blood, but today, nearly six years later, he's my most loving rabbit.

  6. Step 6

    Keep in mind that lop rabbits (rabbits with floppy ears) often have more ear problems than rabbits with upright ears (although, again, this is not always the case as one of my rabbits with upright ears has had two infections).

  7. Step 7

    Keep in mind that rabbits with long fur, such as Angoras and Jersey Wooleys require daily grooming, and sometimes more than once a day during molting (shedding) season to prevent tangled fur and stomach impaction from furballs.

  8. Step 8

    Bring your rabbit home in his new travel case and line the case with a soft fleece blanket (in winter) or a flat, flannel-covered, waterproof crib mat (in summer).

Wednesday, May 12, 2010

World of French Lops.

Holland Lop Rabbits - All About This Popular Breed

One of the more popular breeds of bunnies is the super-cute Holland Lop. As their name would suggest, they were originally bred in the Netherlands in the 1960's and would easily be the second most popular breed of rabbit today (Netherlands Dwarf being the most popular).

Holland Lop rabbits are closely related to the Netherlands Dwarf having been crossed with these and the French Lop originally. They are sometimes referred to as the 'Netherlands Dwarf Lop' although this is not a name (or breed) recognised by the American Rabbit Breeders Association (ARBA).

Holland Lops range in size from around 2 3/4 to 4 pounds so are by far the littlest lop on the block. They are bred to look much stockier than they actually are and many people are surprised to feel just how light they are when they pick one up.

How To Spot Holland Lop

These Lops are a very unique looking breed and easy to spot. Of course they have the cute-as-a-bug floppy lop ears (which should be short and wide) but their most distinctive features are the prominent crown on their head (the part between their ears) and small compact body. Their body should be twice as large as their head, compared to a commercial body type where the body is three times as large as the head.

They fall into 'normal fur type' and 'compact body shape' categories. They are officially recognized in over 20 colors but you're most likely to see them in White, Black (either broken or solid) and tortoise shell.

Personality

When it comes to personality, Holland Lops shine! While every bunny is an individual these lops are generally friendly, calm and very inquisitive. They are the extroverts of the bunny world and like to be the centre of attention.

Many bunny owners swear that their Holland Lop loves to snuggle and play more than most buns so it's easy to see why they have become so popular.

Holland Lop rabbits are a great choice for family pets. Their personality and size makes them easy to handle, and their unbearably cute looks make them hard to resist. A great choice!

How to Feed Baby Cottontail Rabbits

Baby cottontail rabbits are incredibly cute, and it is tempting to want to feed them. You might be doing so because you found an orphaned rabbit, or because you simply enjoy interacting with wildlife. Most people are unfamiliar with the dietary habits of cottontail rabbits, especially BABIES, It is therefore beneficial to familiarize yourself with their favorite foods and eating habits if you wish to feed these animals.

  1. Step 1

    If you're considering "adopting" an abandoned baby, first determine if it truly needs human intervention. A well-meaning human can jeopardize the life of a cottontail who, while small, would have been able to successfully survive on its own. Also do not assume that a nest of rabbits has been abandoned. Mother rabbits tend to leave their babies alone for long periods of time, and cannot be seen at the nest during most daylight hours.

  2. Step 2

    Mix the formula. Powdered formula is easiest, as you can then add water and Pedialyte according to the rabbit's needs. You can mix this formula each time you need to feed the rabbit, or make an entire day's worth and keep it in the refrigerator. If you decide to refrigerate, make sure to warm it before you feed it to the rabbit. It should come to about the same temperature as the rabbit. Make sure to hold the rabbit with its head upwards while it's eating.

  3. Step 3

    When the bunny's eyes open, it's time to start moving them to a more adult diet. Feed them with three parts commercial rabbit food and one part of their natural diet, such as dandelions and clover. You can supplement this with small quantities of things like spinach and carrots.

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

How to Keep Rabbits out of Your Vegetables

  1. Step 1

    Surround larger vegetables with a circular cage made of rabbit wire. You can buy it at home stores or HARDWARE STORES. Small rabbits may get through larger openings so you may want to cover the cage with a second layer of chicken wire.

  2. Step 2

    If you have solid fencing throughout much of you GARDEN, but there is a gap at the bottom or you have chain link or cast metal fences, you can attach a 2 - 3' roll of chicken wire about a foot up from the bottom. Then bury the bottom like an apron 1 - 2' deep. Rabbits can dig so this will keep them from going under the fence. It will also keep out snakes and many other burrowers like gophers and moles.

  3. Step 3

    Build a raised vegetable garden. This will have many additional benefits including ease of reach and better control over soil and water.

  4. Step 4

    Fence in a special area with a solid base or a dug-down barrier. You can design your area creatively like a small house or shed. If you add a roof -- even a wire one, you'll keep out all potential animals including birds. Basically, you are constructing a big cage out of wood and chicken wire or hardware cloth, but you can get artistic in how you design it.

  5. Step 5

    You can also try some of the organic repellents available in garden centers or online stores. These are processed scents of predators that may discourage rabbits from the area. Other ideas are using pet dogs and cats as hunters, but it depends on whether the animal is good at catching prey or not and whether or not you are in an area that is safe for them to run loose in. Also blood meal may work for you as a deterrent. You can trap your rabbits, but then you're stuck with getting rid of the rabbit. And you can feed your rabbits to dissuade them from your vegetables. This will work only if you have a small, limited population. Otherwise you will be attracting even more rabbits and that's not exactly the solution needed!

  6. Step 6

    In short, if you can't fence in your area, then I'd suggest you use as many of the suggestions in step #5 as often as possible. But go for the fencing or cages if you can. And good luck with your vegetable garden!

Sunday, May 9, 2010

How to Draw a Lop Rabbit

Lop-eared rabbits are adorable creatures that are among the oldest breeds of domesticated rabbits. They look like regular rabbits except for their long ears, which are relaxed and lop down around their faces. There are five different kinds of lop-eared rabbits, each of which share the distinct ear feature: English lops, French lops, Holland lops, dwarf lops, and the American Fuzzy lop. Drawing a lop-eared rabbit isn't hard if you make sure to keep all the parts of the rabbit properly in portion with each other.

  1. Step 1

    Draw out the head and body outline of a rabbit on a piece of paper using a pencil, skipping the ears for now. The body should have a fat, sideways oval shape and the head should connect without an obvious neck. Use the side of your pencil to create soft wisps all over the outside edge of the head and body to create some soft looking fur.

  2. Step 2

    Draw feet protruding from the bottom of the body. The lop rabbit's front paws look a little like fuzzier versions of cat paws, and the back legs should have long flat feet that come out of rounded haunches. A small, circular-shaped puff tail resides in the back.

  3. Step 3

    Create the rabbit's lop ears. They should be rooted on each side at the top of the rabbit's head and drape down to almost touch the floor. The ends of the ears are rounded.

  4. Step 4

    Add any distinct facial features and fur patterns, using a picture of a lop eared rabbit if necessary. The eyes are large and round. Whiskers sprout from the sides of the nose, and the fur can be any color from white to solid to patterned.

  5. Step 5

    Use an eraser to remove any overlapping or stray lines to sharpen the drawing.

Saturday, May 8, 2010

How to Sculpt a Rabbit

The rabbit is one of nature's most graceful and picturesque animals. It's no surprise that sculptors find an alluring challenge in crafting the sleek BEUTY of these creatures in stone. A well-trained sculptor will be able to find the nuances of these animals and make them come alive.

  1. Step 1

    Assemble pictures of rabbits in different poses and actions, as well as different close ups and angles.

  2. Step 2

    Choose a photo as the base of your sculpture and decide on a pose you want to dedicate your efforts to. Rabbits can be running, jumping or just sitting. This will make the basic foundation for your sculpture.

  3. Step 3

    Begin carving away details while looking at a close-up photo of a rabbit, and get the rabbit to look like you want. Pay close attention to the eyes, ears and tail, creating a finer form of the rabbit.

  4. Step 4

    Find the close up shots that you saved in order to recreate the details of a rabbit. Pay close attention to the pattern of hair and the way the skin folds around the bones and shoulders.

  5. Step 5

    Finish off your sculpture by polishing away any imperfections. Many people believe this is the only way to show the sleekness and grace that living rabbits have. Carefully polish the stone, as it may take away a slight amount of detail.

Friday, May 7, 2010

How to Clean a Rabbit Fur Hat

When it comes to cleaning all types of fur, you are pretty limited in how intensively you can clean a fur garment. Because fur comes from a living animal and is so fragile and delicate, often requiring very specific environments for storage, cleaning it is an equally delicate process. For example, you cannot put a fur garment in the WASHING MACHINE or scrub it with a soapy rag. Nevertheless, there steps you can take to clean your rabbit fur hat and improve its appearance without seeking the help of professional cleaners or a furrier.

  1. Step 1

    Take the hat outside and hold each side of the hat with either hand. Hold the fur hat upside down.

  2. Step 2

    Shake the hat vigorously. If there is an active breeze or wind, let the fresh air blow through the fur. This is useful particularly if your hat has been in storage for awhile and has a mothball or musty smell.

  3. Step 3

    Stroke the fur gently with your hand to remove any implanted, stuck-on or dried-on debris.

  4. Step 4

    Brush the fur in the direction of the grain with a soft, natural-bristle hair brush. This will help remove any embedded dust.

Monday, May 3, 2010

How to Stop Rabbits from Eating Your Flower Garden

Rabbits eat  the tender parts of flowers.
Rabbits eat the tender parts of flowers.
Robert Gyöpös
Rabbits can seem cute, but they can wreak havoc on your flower and vegetable GARDEN. While most people associate rabbits with vegetables like carrots and lettuce they will also eat the tender young parts of most plants. In the flower garden they can destroy seedlings, flower buds, and BULBS like TULIPS. Use repellents, traps, fences and natural predators to keep rabbits out of your flower garden.

  1. Step 1

    Make a chicken wire fence. Use chicken wire with openings that are one inch or smaller. The fence should be at least two feet high and extend a few inches below ground. Dig a trench around the flower bed and sink the chicken wire about six inches into the ground.

  2. Step 2

    Repel the rabbits with organic materials like bone meal cayenne pepper, or black pepper. This is best scattered around plants just before sun sets, as the rabbits will come out and eat in the evening.

  3. Step 3

    Trap the rabbits with a humane trap, like a Hav-a-heart. Consult your local humane society for areas where trapped rabbits may be released.

  4. Step 4

    Incorporate plants that rabbits don't like into your landscape. Both lavender and catnip are said to repel rabbits. Some say marigolds keep rabbits away but others report that rabbits eat them like any other tender plant.

  5. Step 5

    Plant rabbit resistant flowers. These include daylily, bellflower, autumn crocus, foxglove, sedum, globe flower, aster, red hot poker, iris, and narcissus.

  6. Step 6

    Attract animals that will scare away the rabbits. Not only will catnip repel rabbits, but it will also attract cats, which will scare away the rabbits.

  7. Step 7

    If the flowers are still seedlings, use floating row covers. These won't be attractive once the plants grow, but they will easily protect plants that are still young and tender-a rabbit's favorite food.

  8. Step 8

    Create a barrier that the rabbits don't like stepping into. Stick many sharp sticks in the ground near the plants and they will not want to negotiate the area.

Baby bunnies at play

Baby Bunny Binkies

ANGGORA

How to Keep Rabbits out of Your Garden

  1. Step 1

    Build a two foot high fence around your vegetable garden to keep the rabbits out. Poultry wire works best. Bury your fence about eight to ten inches below the ground to keep rabbits from borrowing beneath it. Make sure you keep any gates closed since rabbits will find this a great way into your vegetable garden.

  2. Step 2

    Raise your beds about eighteen inches off the ground.

  3. Step 3

    Buy some garden netting or anti-animal netting and place it over your vegetables. You should be able to find netting at a local garden supply store.

  4. Step 4

    Install motion detector sprinklers. These will turn on whenever a rabbit approaches your garden, sprinkling them with water and scaring them away.

  5. Step 5

    Sow clover around your vegetable garden. Rabbits will eat clover over vegetables and may fill up on the clover rather than your garden.

  6. Step 6

    Plant a double-row of onions around your garden. Rabbits don't like onions and will find another area to forage.

  7. Chemical Solutions to Keep the Rabbits Away

  8. Step 1

    Dilute hot pepper sauce into water and sprinkle onto your plants. You will have to reapply after heavy watering or rain.

  9. Step 2

    Sprinkle fox or coyote urine around your garden. Large animal urines are available at many gardening or farm supply stores.

  10. Step 3

    Get some human hair from your barber or hair dresser and sprinkle it around your garden. In addition, human hair is a great fertilizer for your vegetables.

How to Take Care of Dwarf Rabbits

  1. Step 1

    Set up your dwarf rabbit's new home. Many people allow their rabbits free run of the house. If this is not an option for you, purchase a large exercise pen or a large cage (the bigger the better) for your new dwarf bunny. Be sure to provide a litter box, with wood stove pellets or non-clumping cat litter acting as litter, as house rabbits can be easily litter trained.

  2. Step 2

    Purchase a high quality timothy hay or orchard grass and high quality timothy hay-based pellets for your house rabbit. He should have access to plenty of fresh hay at all times. Dwarf rabbits under six months can have unlimited pellets while those over six months should be given one quarter cup of pellets each day.

  3. Step 3

    All house rabbits need fresh, dark, leafy greens, such as parsley and romaine lettuce, in their diet. Dwarf rabbits should be given a minimum of two cups of vegetables per day. A small baby carrot or a small piece of banana or apple may also be given daily as a treat.

  4. Step 4

    Provide your house rabbit with plenty of toys, such as old phone books and toilet paper rolls (ideal for chewing) and plastic baby keys.

  5. Step 5

    Give your rabbit a box that she can hide in, climb on, and chew. Boxes are an ideal place to hide when a rabbit is scared and they are a great source of entertainment.

  6. Step 6

    If your rabbit is confined to a cage or a pen, ensure he has at least four hours of exercise time out of his cage or pen each day. Make sure phone wires, computer wires, and other wires are out of reach before you let your bunny out. Dwarf rabbits, like all rabbits, love to chew.

  7. Step 7

    Make an appointment with a rabbit-savvy vet to have your rabbit spayed or neutered to prevent unwanted babies. Even if you only have one rabbit, altering is essential to his or her health.

  8. Step 8

    Dwarf rabbits, like all house rabbits, are sociable animals who crave attention, so make sure you spend plenty of time with your rabbit and give him lots of attention.